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Featured image: Networks supported by Anyblock Analytics

Did you know that there are over 40 Ethereum-based public blockchains at this very moment?

While Ethereum Mainnet is by far the most widely used Ethereum-based network, there is an entire ecosystem of smaller networks that could be useful for developers, enterprise blockchains, or consortia projects.

Join us as we explore 17 of the hottest Ethereum-based networks across three core categories. We’ll analyze the key characteristics of each and offer our insider tips on which networks to avoid and which ones we recommend integrating into your existing systems.

This blog post is based on the presentation given at Ethereum Community…


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Featured image: Source code example

Welcome! In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Python to query the Anyblock Elasticsearch blockchain data API. First, you will learn to initiate your Elasticsearch Python client. Then we will show you different queries to retrieve data from the Anyblock Index and how to work with Pandas Dataframes to analyze Ethereum Blockchain data. It is obviously possible to do all the query experiments in Python, but we recommend you to test your queries with cURL, or in Postman, and then copy those over to your Python code.

You will learn:

  • How to install and import the necessary libraries


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Featured image: Exemplary insight into Metabase dashboard creation

Why use Metabase for blockchain analytics?

Here at Anyblock Analytics, we choose Metabase as our primary blockchain visualization tool because it enables business users to answer their questions themselves, rather to wait for precious developer time. This is possible because of the simple Metabase point and click editor so that no SQL query language needs to be used (but it can).

The other great feature is the ease of sharing Metabase blockchain dashboards publicly or with the respective shareholders. The link to do so is generated with two clicks and the graphs can just as easily be embedded into websites or users’ internal applications.

What is Metabase in general?

“Metabase is…


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TheGraph’s curation program has allowed us to learn about TheGraph ecosystem, how Subgraphs work, and evaluate which subgraphs are high quality and useful to users. It was also extremely insightful to learn how subgraphs are developed, deployed, and used. We at Anyblock have developed a dashboard that leverages the subgraph from TheGraph Testnet to visualize meaningful and important metrics for curators, indexers, and other interested users.

How TheGraph advances web3

We at Anyblock believe in TheGraph because it advances blockchain and web3 in several ways.

  • TheGraph enables essential decentralization so that no one entity, or organization, controls what is relevant to users.
  • TheGraph advances…


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(Featured Image Source: Chris Haws on Unsplashed)

In this article, we are going to explore the gas price trend for Ethereum and explain why it is important to track the gas price. First we want to explain how the gas price is determined and why gas is important in the Ethereum ecosystem. Then we will query the Anyblock ElasticSearch blockchain data API to obtain the desired information. Furthermore we will examine if there are patterns in the gas price trend. The last section is covering the method and a short tutorial for obtaining and visualizing the data. …


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Featured Image Source: TheGraph Explorer

This article is directed towards existing and potential curators of TheGraph protocol. TheGraph is an indexing protocol for querying data on the Ethereum network. Thanks to the protocol every developer is able to create and publish open APIs and thus make blockchain data available to users both easily and cost-efficiently. The respective open APIs are called “subgraphs”. However, this raises some important questions:

Which subgraphs are worth being indexed and utilized by users?
And who can help to make the suitable subgraphs accessible?

The response to these questions is the job of curators. They use GRT tokens to signal which…


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Featured image: Source code example

Welcome! In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Python to query the Anyblock ElasticSearch blockchain data API. First you will learn to initiate your ElasticSearch Python client. Then we will show you different queries to retrieve data from the Anyblock Index and how to work with Pandas Dataframes to analyze Ethereum Blockchain data. It is obviously possible to do all the query experiments in Python, but we recommend you to test your queries with cURL, or in Postman, and then copy those over to your Python code.

You will learn:

  • How to install and import the necessary libraries

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In the first part of this series about blockchain oracles, we explained the oracle problem, what a blockchain oracle is and how they work in general.
We also gave examples of different blockchain oracle networks and want to continue here with Chainlink as the by far most prominent system and dive deeper into its processes.

The Chainlink blockchain oracle network

Chainlink aims to create a “highly generalized oracle framework where users can create any oracle design pattern to retrieve and validate data in a highly secure and reliable manner”. This is achieved by building a trusted marketplace for consumers of oracle information and oracle node…


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(Featured Image Source: Decentralised Oracles: a comprehensive overview)

In this article, we are going to explain why we need blockchain oracles and the general oracle problem and its use cases. Then we describe the terminology around blockchain oracles and how they work.
Last but not least, we present examples of different blockchain oracle networks and provide a list of links for additional reading.

Why do we need blockchain oracles?

Smart contracts are the key concept behind the Ethereum platform or more generally speaking blockchain 2.0 — the second generation (after Bitcoin) in the evolution of blockchain technology, which is the foundation of most use-cases today.

Smart contracts rely on deterministic triggers to execute their…


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Featured image: EWC smart contract cluster dashboard

Check out our brand new blockchain analytics dashboard of the most active smart contracts on the the Energy Web Chain (EWC) above.
Or check the online version constantly updated in real-time.
Thanks to our data science specialist David Brodhagen for putting these charts together!

Dashboard structure and findings

In the top row of graphs you can see, that over 80% of all the 330 smart contracts on the network were deployed from three entities.

Going down the dashboard you can see on the left side four different categories by which we analysed the smart contract activities:

  • Incoming Transactions
  • Count of Events
  • Cumulative Gas Used

Anyblock Analytics GmbH

Anyblock Analytics is a German blockchain solution provider. We offer consulting, tools and data to integrate business processes with blockchain.

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